Archive of ‘Tutorials’ category

Stash busting – 100 days of crochet challenge

I’m a sucker for punishment; I regularly make myself too busy and then stress out because I have too much to do and want to lay on the sofa watching Gilmore Girls but feel guilty for stopping. So what did I do when I returned from our holiday in Greece in August? I started a new one-a-day project… to keep me super busy!

I’ve called it #100daysofleannescrochet over on Instagram and the idea is quite simply to crochet a granny square a day and join it to a blanket. I made a similar blanket for Freds earlier in the year and this one will be going to a local cat charity. I’ve got far too much wool and stash busting for animal charities feels like a good use of my limited time.

I’m recording the whole thing on Instagram using #100daysofleannescrochet so pop over to see how it’s grown. I haven’t taken on a daily craft project like this since the sky blanket and there have been a mixed bag of days; one where I get it done as soon as I wake up, and others when I’m doing it in bed literally falling asleep as I crochet. This week marks the half way point and I love knowing that by Christmas (providing I get the border done) I’ll have made another blanket.

So if you’re looking for stash busting ideas, this is a pretty good one and by doing it daily makes it really manageable. I’ve also written a previous post on stash busting ideas, should you be on the lookout for project ideas!

Are you working on any interesting craft projects at the moment? I’ve had to restart a Christmas present, which I would be annoyed about, but I’d rather get it right and give a gift I know will be the best it can.

Thanks for reading!

Leanne x

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Attic 24’s ripple blanket – my first crochet project

Just over a year ago I’d come to the conclusion that crochet just wasn’t for me. No matter how many times I tried, I ultimately got cross, made a mess and any attempts to teach me usually ended up with raised voices or wool thrown across the room. Oops. Then I went to the Knitting and Stitching show and picked up three balls of very bright wool and said to myself “I’m going to make a ripple blanket out of these”. And hey presto, that will to learn and determination to finally be able to crochet was born.


Making Attic 24's ripple blanket, my first crochet project


Thankfully I had my friend Tam on hand to help get me started. I think because I had a plan in mind for the wool that it gave me that push to finally learn it. Here are a couple of pictures from those early days.

It took me just over a year, in between other projects, but the ripple blanket is finished and I feel pretty proud of it. Once I got the hang of the stitches, granted Tam did the first chain row for me, I found it quite relaxing. There’s something quite soothing about the ripple blanket and how it goes up and down and the stitches change regularly, but not too much to make it complicated. Plus, Lucy’s pattern is a dream to work with – her instructions are so clear and perfect for someone who’s new to the craft.


Attic 24's ripple blanket - my first crochet project!


So if you’d like to have a go at making a ripple blanket yourself I’ve jotted down some of the bits and pieces you’ll need.

While the yarn might not seem the best quality (only £1.25 a ball!), I have to say I quite liked working with it. It’s quite thick, but smooth to work with and glide over a crochet hook. I wouldn’t rule out working with it again in the future, so worth checking out.


Making Attic 24's ripple blanket, my first crochet project


The finished size of the blanket was: 132.5 x 187cm; it comfortable covers our bed. I worked in the following sequence: Green (two rows), blue (two rows), pink (two rows), cream (two rows), green/blue/pink (one row), cream (two rows). For that middle one row I changed it each time; I introduced the cream just to break up the blanket from the boldness of the other shades!

What do you think? Have you made a ripple blanket before? If not I really recommend it, especially as a first time crochet project. Choose yarn or colours you really love and just go for it!

Thanks for reading,

Leanne x

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Making a cosy stripe blanket

One of the best things – if not the very best thing – about crafting is being able to make something for a loved one. I made Attic 24’s cosy stripe blanket for a friend of mine, who is expecting her first baby this month. I made it back in March so I’m pretty happy to finally be able to share it with you today!


Making a cosy stripe baby blanket - pattern from Attic 24 and made using Stylecraft Special DK. Post from This Little Space of Mine


If you’re a regular reader you may remember seeing this very colour scheme pop up in my baby colour scheme ideas post last month. It was the closest I could come to sharing what I’d made before the baby shower and I referenced the colours chosen as being a middle ground between neutral and gender specific. I knew my friend was expecting a little boy, but didn’t want too much blue, or anything too bold, and felt like she’d want something more ‘natural’ and warm, so after playing around with my yarn pegs I decided on Stylecraft Special DK’s Cream, Stone, Parchment, Duck Egg and Soft Peach. There’s an argument to say Soft Peach isn’t really boy-proof, but with the balance of the other shades I think it’s fine.

Before I go into anymore details, here’s a bit of essential information you need if you’d like to make a cosy stripe blanket.

You’ll need:

A couple of other bits of information for you:

  • The finished size of the blanket was: 78 x 91cm
  • I adapted the pattern with a pram/buggy in mind, so worked to 124 trebles and 40/41 granny’s
  • Lucy works with a 4mm hook, but as my tension can be a little tight I opted for a bigger hook – one that I’m more comfortable using

I’ve mentioned the shades I worked with, the ordering was Cream, Stone, Duck Egg, Cream, Parchment, Soft Peach. The Stone and Parchment shades felt close, so I opted to keep them apart. I think it was my Mum who said there was a classic Neapolitan ice cream feel about the colours together and I quite agree!


Making a cosy stripe baby blanket - pattern from Attic 24 and made using Stylecraft Special DK. Post from This Little Space of Mine


The cosy stripe blanket had been one I’d had my eye on for a long time and after A LOT of back and forth about what I should make for the baby, I decided to go for the cosy stripe – mainly because I liked the stitch combinations and felt like I would be able to make it. I don’t consider myself as a pro-crocheter just yet, so I wanted something I wouldn’t struggle too much with.

It was certainly a step away from the ripple blanket I’ve been working on and did present me some challenges; those challenges taught me more about crochet so weren’t negative ones in the slightest. The one area I struggled with – and ended up unpicking half of it because – was not adding/forgetting stitches, specifically on the rows of trebles. This caused the blanket to angle itself and grow very oddly, so I unpicked it and made a note of exactly how many stitches should be in each row. Yes, checking them after every row might seem tedious, but for me it meant no more mistakes and that I’d be able to keep its shape.

Once it was finished there was still a little wonkiness, but a quick wash sorted that out; that’s another good thing about Stylecraft Special DK – wash proof. Perfect for a baby!


Making a cosy stripe baby blanket - pattern from Attic 24 and made using Stylecraft Special DK. Post from This Little Space of Mine


How cute is this border? I love the shape of each of the blue sections, kind of like a semi-circle.

All in all this project has a thumbs up from me; the pattern was fun to work on, I loved the colours I chose (even after a couple of moments of doubt), it turned out well and the best thing? My friend loved it when I gave it to her at the baby shower. To make something for her baby felt incredibly special, and I hope to make lots more for him in the future!

So have you every made the cosy stripe blanket? Big thanks to Lucy for Attic 24 for sharing her patterns, they’re always a joy to work on. Love to see pics if you have made one!

Leanne x

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Making a granny square crochet blanket using scrap yarn

Hello! I thought I’d drop in today with some pics and notes on a recent project I finished – a granny square crochet blanket. The idea was to stash bust as much as possible, and to give Freds a nice blanket he could cuddle up on, have in his vet basket and take to the cattery when we go away in August.

I pretty much made it up as I went along, there was no real order to it or decision on how big I’d make it; my main aim was very much to stash bust. Here are a few in progress pics…

I opted to slip stitch into squares for the final round of each granny, meaning I didn’t have a big pile of squares to sew up at the end. My big mistake was not weaving in my ends as I went, so I’d definitely recommend doing that! Just look at the mess I had to tidy up, all when I thought I was really close to finishing it.

It’s also worth noting that the yarns I used were quite different, some sometimes a square would come up smaller/bigger than the others. I thought I might need to block it at the end but, to be honest, it’s a blanket for Freds and I kind of like that some squares aren’t quite the same.

Some quick notes for you too:

  • I made 100 squares in total – the blanket took on a 10×10 form
  • I used a 4.5mm crochet hook
  • The finished size of the blanket was: 105x100cm

When it came to the border, it took me a while to figure out what I wanted to do but in the end I went for two rows of trebles followed by a double crochet stitch for the edging. I’m not too hot on my crochet terminology still, so do correct me if I’m wrong. This project was a great learning curve for a newbie-crocheter, so as well as stash busting I felt like I learnt a lot.

And here’s the finished blanket…


Making a granny square crochet blanket using scrap yarn - all about stash busting! Post from This Little Space of Mine



Making a granny square crochet blanket using scrap yarn - all about stash busting! Post from This Little Space of Mine



Making a granny square crochet blanket using scrap yarn - all about stash busting! Post from This Little Space of Mine


Isn’t it pretty? I loved working with all the different colours, making it up as I went and literally just picking colours as I went – I really didn’t overthink it and matched up colours as I went along. I know some people would also work in rows, but for the majority of this make I worked from the centre out.

And my stash of yarn? Very much busted, but still a whole lot of yarn to use! I’m thinking of making a few more of these and donating them to a cat charity; Freds loves his blanket and cuddles up on it next to me when I’m working at home.

Have you worked on any fun crochet projects recently? Love to see some pics!

Leanne x

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We Make Collective – My first ever weave is complete!

Hello – today I’m sharing with you a few photos and words about the first ever weave I’ve recently made, thanks to my kit from We Make Collective.

First things first, to fill you in on We Make Collective; it’s a bi-monthly craft subscription designed to teach you a new skill, but allow you the freedom to create something unique for you. It was created by Fran from Fall For DIY and launched after a hugely popular Kickstarter campaign last year. I wrote a post a little while back about We Make Collective and my first impressions.

The travel loom weaving kit was the first kit sold and contained everything you could need to make a weave you’d be proud of.


A first look at We Make Collective, A craft subscription box with a difference, We Make focuses on learning a particular skill and finding your creativity using a carefully curated kit which is delivered to your door bi-monthly. This Little Space of Mine


Now I know absolutely nothing in the slightest about weaving and, at first, I thought I’d wing it and just see what I made. Big mistake. After a frustrating afternoon I realised that was a bad idea and that, for me, I need a bit more structure to work from. I’d love to be spontaneous but given it was a completely new craft it didn’t work and I knew I’d be better off learning about weaving by following a tutorial.

The great thing about We Make Collective is the members section on the website; it includes tutorials made with the very kit you see above. Learning a new craft can be daunting – the Internet is great but there’s almost too much out there that makes it difficult to know where to start. The We Make Collective members area solves that by giving content related to the very kit you have in your hands – so it’s super encouraging and motivated me that I could definitely make something I’d like! You may remember that for the second kit, all about calligraphy, I contributed this Christmas card themed tutorial.

I followed a tutorial from Peas and Needles; Lucy’s blog is a relatively new find for me, but it’s so pretty and full of great inspiration. Lucy has a lot of experience in weaving and even offers workshops to teach you, so worth having a look at. The tutorial was lovingly called the super-tassel woven wall hanging, and here’s how it turned out…


We Make Collective - Weave wall hanging project is complete. Find out how I made it and more over on This Little Space of Mine



We Make Collective - Weave wall hanging project is complete. Find out how I made it and more over on This Little Space of Mine


Doesn’t it look pretty?

I love the bold colours; now it’s hung up in my craft room it’s come to life and works well with the minty green colour on the walls. The only thing I had to buy was a piece of dowel to hang it, which I picked up from eBay here.

It was great fun to do and I actually found it quite addictive – in the same way I find embroidery addictive. Once you start a row or working with a particular colour, you want to finish it and before you know it a whole lot of time has passed!

The other great thing with the kit is that I still have everything I need to make another weave – I probably even have enough wool to do another (along with my various supplies!). I’ll be honest and say I don’t think I’m in a great rush to make another, but only because I have a heap of other stuff I want to make and I’m such a multi crafter; weaving has been ticked off the list so I’m done now. But who knows, I can see myself picking it up again in the future.


We Make Collective - Weave wall hanging project is complete. Find out how I made it and more over on This Little Space of Mine


It looks great on display and I’m super proud to have something I made hanging up in my craft room. Yay for new crafts!

What do you think? Fancy giving weaving a go yourself? The next kit is for lino and block printing, which sounds like great fun; you can find out more and get involved here.

Thanks for reading and I hope you have a great weekend! I’m helping my friend with wedding prep tomorrow and we’re having our measurements taken for the bridesmaid dresses – can’t wait!

Leanne x

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wemakecollective-weave-withtext.fw


Making Sincerely Louise’s fox slippers from Mollie Makes

Hello! So in the last week I’ve shared a travel post and a marketing post… so it’s well and truly time to get back to something crafty! So today I’m sharing with you a recent make – Sincerely Louise’s fox slippers (the pattern is from Mollie Makes).

Confession time: I love foxes. I don’t know what it is about them, something about them being the underdog and disliked by many, but I think they’re beautiful. There seems to be a lot of fox paraphernalia around these days, which I generally don’t like (remember when it was owls?!), but I couldn’t resist Sincerely Louise‘s fox slippers pattern when it popped up in Mollie Makes issue 61 just before Christmas.


Making Sincerely Louise's fox slippers - pattern from Mollie Makes - using Bergere De France Ideal yarn to knit these slippers. Post via This Little Space of Mine


Before I get started, if you haven’t heard of Sincerely Louise’s before, she has a book called Faux Taxidermy Knits available which contains… well, exactly as the title suggests. The knits look like a lot of fun to make and I love Louise’s style.


Making Sincerely Louise's fox slippers - pattern from Mollie Makes - using Bergere De France Ideal yarn to knit these slippers. Post via This Little Space of Mine


Sincerely Louise’s fox slippers

Here are a few work in progress pics from my Instagram feed

You’ll need:


Making Sincerely Louise's fox slippers - pattern from Mollie Makes - using Bergere De France Ideal yarn to knit these slippers. Post via This Little Space of Mine


While the pattern suggested you could carry the yarn when a shade isn’t in use, I was concerned I’d catch my feet in them over time so bravely decided to give intarsia a go. I’ve tried it maybe twice before and was pretty nervous but after watching a couple of YouTube videos and just getting on with it, I was pleased with the end result. It’s in no way perfect and I could definitely improve, but it wasn’t a disaster.

I should also mention that reading the instructions is so important; I bought the yarn and was about to start and then realised the pattern was for size 6, when I’m size 4.5/5. Oops. The pattern even gives you alternative yarn ideas for smaller sizes but silly me it was a bit late for that, so I opted to go for 2.5mm and 3mm knitting needles – swapping 3.5mm for 3mm. A little risky but thankfully they fit me perfectly.

When I made the first slipper I found I spent a lot of time detangling threads of yarn compared to just knitting. I was working with a total of five threads of yarn (2 cream and 3 in orange), so it was kind of the inevitable but really put me off starting the second slipper. After a bit of a google and asking on Instagram I found knitters often use embroidery bobbins and boy what a difference it made! There was still a little bit of tangling, but nothing compared to the first time around. Definitely a top tip; someone also suggested used a peg, which could work in the same way.

In terms of the yarn I used, I’d never heard of Bergere De France before and found it soft and easy to work with. It reminded me of the MillaMia soft aran I recently worked with, though the two are blended very differently.


Making Sincerely Louise's fox slippers - pattern from Mollie Makes - using Bergere De France Ideal yarn to knit these slippers. Post via This Little Space of Mine


So that’s it. Aren’t they cute? I haven’t stopped wearing them!

Oh and if you love foxes as much as I do, be sure to let me know and also check out my fox themed Pinterest board.

Follow Leanne | This Little Space’s board Foxes on Pinterest.

What’ve you been making recently? A big thanks to Mollie Makes and Sincerely Louise for this slipper pattern!

Leanne x

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The New Craft House’s Knicker Making Kit

Sewing and dressmaking has always been one of those crafts that I convince myself I’ll learn eventually, but generally don’t prioritise. I do have a pile of pretty fabrics that look great in my craft room, but that’s as far as they’re going at the moment! That being said, I want to sew and would like to eventually make clothes (and finish a dress I started in 2013!), so when the ladies at The New Craft House sent me their knicker making kit I thought it’d be perfect for me.

I’ve been friends with Hannah and Rosie for a while now and these ladies know their crafts; they’re sewing pros and I’m always so impressed by all the clothes they make for themselves. They’ve launched their shop selling their own craft kits with two products – a knicker making kit (£18) and a English paper pieced cushion cover (£22). I’ve also heard they’re expanding their product range very soon – can’t wait to see what’s next.


The New Craft House Knicker Making Kit review - This Little Space of Mine


The New Craft House’s Knicker Making Kit

I opted for the knicker making kit in the pink daisy fabric and the kits are advertised as being suitable for anyone with basic machine sewing skills and advise that they can be made in around 2-3 hours – which is about as long as it took me (with a few pit stop cup of teas!). The kit itself includes a reusable pattern in UK sizes 6-16, step-by-step instructions, cotton lawn Sevenberry fabric in a choice of five prints, elastic and cotton jersey for the gusset. All I needed was pins, scissors, thread and my trusty sewing machine.


The New Craft House Knicker Making Kit review - This Little Space of Mine


I nervously worked through the pattern one Sunday afternoon; lack in confidence with sewing means it takes me about five reads of an instruction before I can work out what I need to do. The instructions were both visual and written, so this was a great help.

Once I’d cut it all out and began sewing I began to feel a bit more confident… then fun with elastic began! I’ve never ever sewed with elastic before and it definitely challenged me, but the good news is I did it and I reckon I did it pretty well – a couple of minor hiccups but overall I was happy. That goes for the finished knickers – I’m surprised at how good they look, I was so sure I was making mistakes left, right and centre. It just goes to show that I should be a bit braver with my sewing!


The New Craft House Knicker Making Kit review - This Little Space of Mine


All in all I think this kit is great, it does exactly what it says on the tin (and you get the kit in an actual tin!) and I was able to make something from start to finish, on my own, in my sitting. That gets a thumbs up in my book! So a big thank you to The New Craft House for their product and the thought that’s gone into it.

Be sure to keep an eye on their shop – I can’t wait to see what The New Craft House do next. Watch out for another post on here next month featuring Hannah and Rosie…

Have you got the sewing bug?

Leanne x

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This kit was given to me by the team at The New Craft House as a complimentary product. Please note that all opinions and tales of dodgy sewing are my own!

MillaMia Elika Wristwarmers from Finishing Touch

As the colder weather doesn’t seem to be letting up, I’m still wearing my MillaMia wristwarmers that I made for myself over Christmas. I’ve worked with MillaMia merino yarn before, when I made this adorable baby hat, but I was curious about using their soft aran yarn and picked up a couple of balls alongside their Finishing Touch book back when I went to The Knitting and Stitching show in October 2014 – yep, it’s taken me this long to make them! I’ll use this post to talk through how I made them and how you can make them too.


MillaMia Wristwarmers from Finishing Touch book - cable knitting with aran yarn - This Little Space of Mine


You’ll need:


MillaMia Wristwarmers from Finishing Touch book - cable knitting with aran yarn - This Little Space of Mine


MillaMia Wristwarmers

Before I get started, I have to say that these were incredibly quick to work up; I sat and made them over the Christmas holidays and completed them within a couple of days. While cable knitting had been something I was wary of before, once I got going and you get yourself into a rhythm with it, it’s straightforward and an enjoyable pattern to work with. Plus, the stitch looks great and I love the depth it gives. I’d only ever tried cabling once before, when I made this cowl, so the pattern isn’t too complex.

The yarn itself is smooth to work with and glides through the needles; having worn these over the last month or so they definitely keep me warm, so a great yarn choice for the colder weather.


MillaMia Wristwarmers from Finishing Touch book - cable knitting with aran yarn - This Little Space of Mine


While I was making them I did have concerns as to whether I’d have enough of the Teal shade, so something to be wary of – had I run out I would’ve introduced the Slate shade a little sooner. There also aren’t any detailed instructions on joining, so I just put it against my hand to see where the gap for my thumb needed to be.

The great thing about these wristwarmers is that they’re unisex and MillaMia have a great selection of colours to choose from. I chose Teal and Slate, but I’m tempted to make them again in Magenta and Ochre – for a brighter make.

What do you think? Tempted to give them a go?

Thank you for reading! If you have any questions on how I made these wristwarmers do drop me a comment below. Now where is that warmer weather? I’m looking forward to spring…

Leanne x

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Making a Heidi Bear Fatty Lumpkin crochet pony

After finally getting to grips with crochet back in the summer last year, I decided to set myself the ambitious challenge of making two Heidi Bear Fatty Lumpkin crochet pony’s – to give to our nieces for their 5th birthdays at the end of December. I wrote a work in progress post a while back, but pleased today to finally share a write up of how I made them and what I learnt.

This was a pretty significant project for me (and one I enjoyed every minute of) so I want to do this make justice. I’ve therefore broken this post down into sections to make it an easy read. Hopefully this post will encourage you to have a go at making one!


Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine


You’ll need:


Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine



Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine



Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine


Finished sizing:
  • Height of body: approx 26cm
  • Total height (including the head): approx 35cm
  • Length: 40cm
Making the African flowers

Before you get started the best thing you can do is have a go at making an African flower; Heidi Bear’s website has a free pattern for the flower and, while the joining can be tricky, if you can get to grips with how to make the flower this will put you in good stead. This was advice I took from fellow crocheters and making the flower first gave me a good feeling as to whether I could make the pony.

There a various shapes of the flower and for each pony you’ll be tasked with making the following:

  • 19 pentagons
  • 17 hexagons
  • 3 squares
  • 2 heptagons (probably my favourite shape!)
  • 1 triangle

I recommend weaving in the loose ends as you crochet the next round; it saves so much time at the end!

The ordering of colours I decided on for the ponies was as follows:

  • Pink: Fiesta for the centre, then Candyfloss before Fondant for the edge. Cream was used for joining
  • Purple: Emperor for the centre, then Clematis before Wisteria for the edge. Cream was used for joining
Joining the African flowers to form the shape

Joining was the part of the pattern I was most nervous about; it’s quite time consuming and definitely requires quite a bit of concentration, there’s no two ways about it. What I will say is that if you can make the flowers then I believe you can successfully join the flowers too – so don’t be put off by that.

The hardest bit about joining for me is that I’m left handed and naturally work in the opposite direction to the pattern; it wasn’t a barrier for me, but meant I needed to concentrate and think about how best to join. The hardest section to join is most definitely the legs, but stick with it. The body and head are a piece of cake!

Stuffing the pony and finishing touches

Stuffing each pony does take time – but it’s time well spent. A tip I had from my Mum was to break down the stuffing and add little bits at a time; the stuffing will naturally break down over time, so it gives you a chance to shape the pony and ensure it’s solid and will stand up.

Here I have to add how good the pattern is; you can tell a lot of thought and time has gone into it and that goes a long way. There are clear illustrations, diagrams, copy etc. – so it caters for every learning style. You’ll definitely need it page by page when it comes to joining and going about it in the right order.

While you’re working on it, watch out for any cats or dogs you have; for some reason Freddie really didn’t like the pony and more than freaked out when he saw it as he walked in the living room. This picture perfectly shows what went on; I couldn’t help but laugh!


Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine


Keeping organised and working to deadline

I talked a bit in my last post about how I planned to organise myself for making two ponies; I had 14 weeks to make them and knew, with Christmas approaching, that it would be a busy time and leaving it all to the last minute really wouldn’t help me! I gave myself 7 weeks to make each pony and, while I needed that amount for the first pony, by the second I noticed how quickly I sped up and was able to make it in a shorter period. I stopped once I’d made the flowers to make a Christmas gift, but picked it up a couple of weeks later and still finished in good time.

Crafting aside, I like to keep organised and by breaking it down into manageable chucks it didn’t feel too overwhelming a project. In fact, it’s probably why I enjoyed it so much!

Fatty Lumpkin in their new homes

I’ve got to say, taking the ponies to their new home was a bit hard. I loved making them and kind of want to keep them for myself! There was also a chance our nieces wouldn’t take to them (as kids sometimes don’t), but I needn’t have worried. The girls absolutely adored them and still do as I write this post. They’re on the girls’ beds and they cuddle them as they go to sleep. I couldn’t have asked for a better home for them!

Trying to get a still photo of both of them looking at me was near impossible. 😉


Heidi bear crochet pony - This Little Space of Mine


Children being children, they get sick from time to time. It turns out the pink pony got a little dirty and ended up being washed; I’m pleased to say it survived the washing machine! While the neck is a little floppy, it’s come out really well and you wouldn’t really notice. That’s the thing about Stylecraft, it’s so durable and washes up well – perfect for kids.

As you’ve probably guessed already, these two are probably up there with my proudest makes (alongside my sky blanket). I can’t believe I actually was able to make them and that they turned out so well!

Wow, long post! But I’m so happy I’ve finally been able to write this up and share with you my experience.

I’m adding this post to #CreateMakeShare, which this month takes on the theme of love. I absolutely made these with so much love for my nieces, knowing just how happy it could make them.


Create Make Share



Thank you for reading! If you have any questions on how I made them do drop me a comment below. I’m considering making more soon, too, if you’re in the market for one!

Leanne x

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We Make Collective – Calligraphy and brush lettering

Hello! A couple of months back I talked about We Make Collective –  a bi-monthly craft subscription designed to teach you a new skill, the first being all about weaving. Well, to end the year on a high I’m over the moon to tell you I’m a contributor on the second We Make Collective kit – calligraphy and brush lettering!

I’m so pleased to be apart of We Make Collective; Fran is doing a fantastic job and the community around We Make Collective is fully supportive of all forms of creativity – yay for that and not feeling the pressure of crafting in a particular set way, just enjoying the freedom to make something and feel good about it.


We Make Collective - Calligraphy and Brush Lettering - This Little Space of Mine


This month, the collective have focused on calligraphy and brush lettering. A team of us have worked on tutorials and ideas for subscribers and my contribution is these Christmas cards using brush lettering. I’ve added a bit of a twist – with a focus for left handed folk, like me. I know in the past I’ve felt reluctant to try calligraphy or brush lettering through the fear that I’ll end up smudging it and making a mess, but this is where We Make Collective steps in; fully supportive of giving things a go.


We Make Collective - calligraphy tutorial - This Little Space of Mine


It can feel scary to give something new a go, but We Make Collective will give you everything you need – as well as a community of people around you – to learn something new and enjoy it in a way that suits your skill level.


We Make Collective - calligraphy tutorial - This Little Space of Mine


This project also challenged my photography skills – I’m determined to get better at styling and shooting photos; with the added pressure of putting a tutorial for others, I worked really hard to get as best a shoot – with those grey clouds surrounding us! – as I could. And you know what… I’m happy with the results. I’m still learning but pleased with the outcome. 

We Make Collective - calligraphy tutorial - This Little Space of Mine


Have you got your calligraphy and brush lettering kit yet? I’d love to hear how you’re getting on; better still, if you’ve had a go at my Christmas card tutorial say hello!

If you’d like to know more about We Make Collective and purchase the next kit – all about natural dyeing, shibori and batik, pop over to the website now. Thank you, Fran, for letting me be a part of it, it’s been great fun!

Leanne x

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